Skip to main content

Full text of "P & S ... : the yearbook of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University in the city of New York"

See other formats


SSHtsiii 






















fatew 



4 



It:, 



r% 








11 1 



,l1 



<*£*» 



^T<* 



-.**>• 




m 



^A. fj 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Metropolitan New York Library Council - METRO 



http://archive.org/details/psyearbook64colu 



P&S '64 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 
Columbia University 



' COLLEGE ^LfHYSICIA 
schocI. of m 

A-D-l/67 _|_ , 








1 



Dr. Raffaele Lattes and Dr. Donald Tap- 
ley are outstanding as gentlemen and 
scholars. Their stress of logical analysis 
and clear thinking has generated enthus- 
iasm for their respective endeavors. They 
are faithful friends, fair-minded critics 
and sympathetic advisers. The Class 
of 1964 dedicates the Yearbook with 
great appreciation and deep respect 
to Dr. Lattes and Dr. Tapley. 



THE RESPONSIBLE INTERNE 



BY DONALD TAPLEY 



The suggestion of your Yearbook Committee 
that I write something about the philosophy un- 
derlying the third year clerkship in medicine 
appeared somewhat retrospective. Since all of 
you are about to embark on an internship as the 
next step in your career, it seemed to me that it 
might be more appropriate to try to define that 
rather nebulous figure, the responsible interne. 

During your last two years in medicine you 
have gradually assumed more and more respon- 
sibility for the management of patients. But you 
have not yet assumed the entire responsibility for 
a sick person. The successful undertaking of 
this responsibility is a pritical step in your de- 
• velopment as physicians. Certain qualities, dis- 
tinguishing the excellent from the mediocre in- 
terne, seem requisite for success. 

The first essential is a reasonable intelli- 
gence. All of you have this, or you would not 
have competed successfully for admission to 
medical school. The mere possession of such 
native intelligence, however, does not necessarily 
insure its proper use. In the third year clerkship 
great emphasis was placed upon the logical and 
scientific analysis of all the facts known about a 
patient so that one might learn to use this intelli- 
gence in an appropriate and effective fashion. 

The second essential is an adequate fund of 
factual knowledge about the pathophysiology of 
disease. Throughout your first two years at 
medical school you were presented with a large 
body of such knowledge. This process has con- 
tinued during your clinical years, but at a pace 
conditioned by your increasing assumption of 



responsibility. In the third year clerkship some 
of you were perhaps disappointed by the rela- 
tively less concentrated diet of facts provided by 
the faculty. Medical facts, however, are fre- 
quently transient; a knowledge of how to keep 
up with advances in medicine through an appro- 
priate use of books and journals is in the long 
run a more valuable asset. 

The third and most important requirement 
I have chosen to call judgment. This is perhaps 
the most difficult of all for the faculty to impart 
to students, and is perhaps best taught by exam- 
ple. Good judgment in the appraisal and man- 
agement of a patient is not necessarily directly 
correlated either with the fund of factual knowl- 
edge or with the native intelligence which the 
interne possesses. Both, of course, are essential 
but some of the most intelligent internes have the 
poorest clinical judgment. Rather, good judg- 
ment may be correlated with more elusive qual- 
ities: intellectual honesty, humility, compassion, 
and the ability to organise. To be honest intel- 
lectually is to admit to yourself your areas of 
ignorance; to give full weight in your thinking 
to facts which disagree with your preconception 
of the patient's problems and to make careful 
distinction between those diagnostic and thera- 
peutic procedures which are essential to the man- 
agement of the patient and those which are de- 
signed simply to satisfy your intellectual cur- 
iosity. To be humble is to admit the fallibility 
of your most cherished diagnosis, and be willing 
to re-evaluate your position and your approach 
as new facts emerge. One of the most dangerous 



games in medicine is the making of snap diag- 
noses at the bedside. A diagnosis of this kind 
almost invariably generates an emotional at- 
tachment, and such emotion impairs a reasoned 
judgment based on subsequently acquired facts. 
Finally, good clinical judgment is dependent 
upon an ability to organise rationally all the 
known data about a pa- 
tient, giving proper rela- 
tive weight to what may 
appear to be conflicting 
facts and distinguishing 
important information in 
a mass of irrevelancies. 

The fourth essential is 
honesty in dealing with 
associates. One would 
think it superfluous to 
mention this, were it not 
for the fact that occasion- 
ally an interne may tell 
an inquiring attending 
physician that a patient 
could not have a carci- 
noma of the rectum when in fact he has not done 
a rectal examination — though he will do it im- 
mediately after rounds to confirm his statement. 
This is not honest, and the practice of good ward 
medicine is impossible when it occurs. 

The fifth quality is compassion. Compassion 
must be present in most of you or you would not 
now be physicians. This, also, cannot be im- 
parted by instruction, but it is hoped that the 
example of the teacher has been such that you 
have observed the difference that compassion 
can make to the well-being of the patient. 




However, the quality which most frequently 
seems to distinguish the superior from the med- 
iocre interne is the ability to pay meticulous at- 
tention to detail. The good interne knows every- 
thing about the patient's personal and medical 
history; the bad interne invariably fails to know 
some point which is crucial to the management of 
the patient. The good in- 
terne has done a complete 
and accurate physical ex- 
amination and has prop- 
erly interpreted his find- 
ings; the bad interne has 
invariably either failed to 
perform some important 
part of the physical exam- 
ination or to interpret 
properly his findings. The 
good interne has sufficient 
intellectual curiosity to 
acquire more and perti- 
nent information about 
the patient's disease; the 
bad interne invariably 
has not. The importance of paying conscientious 
and meticulous attention to detail in the manage- 
ment of patients cannot be over-emphasized. 
Without it, intelligence is wasted, factual knowl- 
edge is worthless, reasoned judgment is impos- 
sible, honesty is irrelevant, and compassion is 
fraudulent. 

The perfect interne has probably never 
existed, and probably never will. The respon- 
sible interne, however, is not too distant a figure 
for your aspiration and endeavour. May I wish 
all of you the best as you take up your new 
duties. 



THE IVORY TOWER SYNDROME 

By Raffaele Lattes 



When some time ago I accepted the flattering 
invitation to write something for this Year Book, 
I promised myself that I would avoid rhetoric and 
slogans, and that I would try to discuss some topic 
pertaining to our daily life. This led me to the 
decision of writing about an interesting syndrome. 
This is a disease which is endemic in most important 
medical and teaching institutions. 

The disease, or syndrome, is not sex linked and 
is not limited to any age group. It is probably con- 
tagious, but the exact method of transmission is 
not known. We can call it the Ivory Tower Syn- 
drome. The patients who become affected by it 
may look perfectly normal except when they speak 
or write on topics pertaining to their field or speci- 
alty. A trained and keen observer will then detect 
the following symptoms: the patients become dog- 
matic and ignore, or at least disregard entirely, any 
opinion, point of view, research method or results, 
which originated in "other institutions." They con- 
sider reliable and important only the results and 
conclusions reached by them or their "group." 

On careful interviewing, their rationalization 
goes somehow along these lines: a. This is one of 
the greatest medical and scientific centers: b. I 
belong to it (or it belongs to me): c. We have at- 
tained, or are near attaining, excellence in our field: 
d. Ergo, those who disagree with us must by neces- 
sity be wrong and misguided and we need not waste 
our time by paying attention to what they say. The 



Ivory Tower Syndrome is not a rare disease. With 
some experience, it can be diagnosed easily. It is 
apparent that while early detection can be of great 
help in combatting it by isolating the patients, 
adequate prevention is possible and more desirable. 

What was said above was not meant to imply that 
in the biological and medical sciences the opinions 
of a mediocre majority should prevail on those of 
one outstanding individual. What was meant is that 
we must study and respect the opinions and results 
reported by others in our field, and try seriously to 
understand the reasons for the discrepancies that 
may exist between our point of view and theirs. 
For instance, one of the blandest manifestations of 
our syndrome is our frequent tendency to ignore 
the foreign literature. First rate basic and clinical 
research is done abroad as well as here, just as 
poor articles are published here as well as abroad. 
If we acquaint ourselves with what has been done 
and reported elsewhere, not only will we avoid 
reporting as new, observations already made and 
published by others, but we will without fail see our 
own field or specialty in a better perspective. 

In my opinion, the road to excellence is paved 
not only with hard work and superior intellectual 
ability. It also requires understanding and tolerance 
of other points of view, and thorough familiarity 
with work done by others. Without this, we run the 
risk to march down a path leading to narrow minded- 
ness and arrogance. 



The Class of 1964 

College of 

Physicians and 
Surgeons 




Senior Class Officers 
Joseph McCarthy, P&S Club President: Eugene Mayer, Class President; Richard Lipton, Treasurer; Will Andrews, Vice- 
president; Evelyn Grollman, Secretary — absent when picture taken. 



Five years ago many of us considered the year 1964 to be an almost unattainable goal while, 
in retrospect, the year 1959 seems like only yesterday. We have completed four years at P&S 
and most of us have enjoyed being members of the Class of 1964. Our formal association as a class- 
room body has now drawn to a close but the friendships that have been made within our group will 
last forever. With these friendships go many memories. Our tragic moments will be recalled with 
sorrow while our pleasant experiences will always summon up a smile. During the past four years 
we have been together on many occasions, both academic and social. By and large we have func- 
tioned well together and this is to our credit. This is especially notable since the demands of 
medical school are often much greater than those of other graduate schools. For example, the long 
hours, the enormity of the subject material, the search for tuition, and the fact that some of the 
faculty do not consider medical students to be on a plane with other graduate students -will all 
serve to weaken the spirits of any student. It is well that each class develops its own esprit de corps. 

As our formal training at P&S draws to a close we realize that we have gained much from 
this school which offers the best in American medicine. We have also gained much from our associa- 
tion as a class. May we always profit from these exposures. 

— Gene S. Mayer 




WILLARD E. ANDREWS 
A.B., Haverford, 1960 
Palisade, N.J. 
Surgery 



WILLIAM P. AREND 
A.B., Williams, 1959 
Holland Patent, N.Y. 
Medicine 





MICHAEL J. ATTKISS 
A.B., Harvard, 1960 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Surgery 



JEANNE W. BAER 
B.S., Connecticut, 1960 
New Hope, Pa. 
Medicine 





BRUCE L. BALLARD 
A.B., Yale, 1960 
Waverly Hills, Ky. 
Psychiatry 




HOWARD J. BARNUM, JR. 
A.B., Florida Southern, 1942 
Wilton, Conn. 
Pediatrics 







ROLF F. BARTH 
A.B., Cornell, 1959 
Jackson Heights, N.Y. 
Surgery 



DAVID T. BEDELL 
A.B., Virginia, 1960 
Jacksonville, Fla. 
Medicine 





JOSE M. BERIO, JR. 


B.S., Puerto Rico, 1960 


Santurce, Puerto Rico 


Ob-Gyn 


HARRIS A. BERMAN 


A.B., Harvard, 1960 


Concord, N.H. 


Medicine 





A. KENNETH BLAYDOW 
A.B., Princeton, 1958 
Gladwyne, Pa. 
Medicine 



PAUL D. BERK 
A.B., Swarthmore, 1959 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Medicine 




to 




RALPH S. BLUME 
A.B., Amherst, 1960 
Yonkers.N.Y. 

Medicine 



ROBERT L. BOOTHE 
A.B., Princeton, 1960 
Westfield, N.J. 
Surgery 







MIKE M. BRONSHVAG 
A.B., New York University, 

1960 
Bronx, N.Y. 
Medicine 



JOHN R. BROOKS 
A.B., Yale, 1960 
Meriden, Conn. 
Ophthalmology 





ANNE C. BROWER 
A.B., Smith, 1960 
Westfield, N.J. 
Psychiatry 



GERALD D. BUKER 
B.S., Wheaton, 1960 
Vestal, N.Y. 
Surgery 





A. LAWRENCE CERVINO 
A.B., Princeton, 1960 
Greensburg, Pa. 
Surgery 



EDMUND CHAITMAN 
A.B., Hamilton, 1960 
Forest Hills, N.Y. 
Medicine 





PETER S. CHEN 
A.B., Harvard, 1960 
New York City 



JACK C. CHILDERS, JR. 
A.B., Princeton, 1960 
Lexington, N.C. 
Orthopedics 





DAVID S. DAVID 
A.B., Columbia, 1960 
Great Neck, N.Y. 
Medicine 




■ 



BARRY A. DAVIDSON 
B.S., Franklin and 

Marshall. 1960 
Bloomfield. N.J. 
Su rgery 




12 




NEIL DECTER 
A.B.. Columbia, 1960 
Rockaway Beach. N.Y. 
I rology 



FRANK G. DE FL RIA 
A.B.. Harvard. 1960 
Upper Darby. Pa. 
Medicine 





SIMON H. DE MLTH 
A.B.. Princeton. 1960 
New York City 
Neu rology 



THOMAS L. DENT 
A.B., Yale, 1960 
Fayette City, Pa. 
Surgery 





PATRICIA K. DONAHOE 
B.S.. Boston. 1958 
Braintree. Mass. 
Surgery 



STEPHEN J. DOCTOROFF 
A.B., Harvard, 1960 
Newton Centre, Mass. 
Medicine 



u ^ 




13 




JAMES H. EGAN 
B.S., William and Mary, 

I960 
Bellmore, N.Y. 
Medicine. 



SAMUEL O. ESSANDOH 
A.B., Lincoln, 1958 
Ghana, W. Africa 









DAVID V. FORREST 
A.B., Princeton, 1960 
Rockville Centre, N.Y. 

Psychiatry 



WALTER A. FRANCK 
A.B.. Yale, 1960 
Scarsdale, N.Y. 
Medicine 







GERALD S. FREEDMAN 
B.M.E., Cornell, 1959 
Mt. Vernon, N.Y. 
Radiology 



STUART FREYER 
A.B., Columbia, 1960 
Great Neck, N.Y. 
Surgery 



14 





MICHAEL A. FRIEDBERG 
A.B., Williams, 1960 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Surgery 



WILLIAM G. FRIEND 
A.B., Princeton, 1960 
Seattle, Wash. 

Surgery 





BARTLEY R. FRUEH 
B.C.E., Cornell, 1960 
Lakewood, Ohio 
Surgery 



MICHAEL L. GELFAND 
A.B., Columbia, 1960 
New York City 

Surgery 





HOWARD M. GERSTEL 
A.B., Columbia, 1960 
Hewlett, N.Y. 
Medicine 



MARVIN S. GILBERT 
A.B., Columbia, 1960 
Mt. Vernon, N.Y. 
Surgery 




15 




DANIEL H. GOLWYN 
A.B., Kenyon, 1959 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Neurology 



THOMAS F. GREGG 
A.B., Harvard, 1959 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Surgery 





MARTIN G. GRODER 
A.B., Columbia, 1960 

Flushing, N.Y. 
Psychiatry 



LEWIS L. HAMILTON 
B.S., Yale, 1960 
Allison Park, Pa. 
Medicine 





WILLIAM G. HAMILTON 
B.S.E., Princeton. 1954 
Madison. Wis. 

Surgery 



KATHERINE HART 
A.B., Smith, 1960 
Denver, Colo. 

Medicine 




16 




CARLOS L. HENRIQUEZ 
A.B.. Columbia. 1960 
Yonkers, N.Y. 
General Practice 



ARTHUR H. HOYTE 
A.B.. Harvard. I960 
Maiden. Mass. 
Surgery 





ROBERT H. HUMPHRIES 
B.S.. Wheaton. 1960 
Short Hills. N.J. 
Psych iatry 



DAVID D. JOHNSON" II 
A.B.. Harvard. 1960 
Charleston. W.Va. 





ALFRED I. KAPLAN 
A.B.. Columbia, 1960 
New York City 
Medicine 



JOHN G. KAUDERER. JR. 
A.B.. Columbia, 1959 
New York City 
Medicine 





PETER T. KIRCHNER 
A.B., Yale. 1960 
Pierre, S.D. 



J. PHILIP KISTLER 
A.B., Harvard, 1960 
Tulsa, Okla. 





WILLIAM H. 
LAWRENCE, JR. 
A.B., Princeton, 1960 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Medicine 



LEONARD LEVENTER 
A.B., Columbia. 1960 
Merrick, N.Y. 
Research 





ROBERT D. LEWIS 
A.B., Princeton, 1960 
Briarcliff Manor, N.Y. 
Surgery 



RICHARD A. LIPTON 
A.B.. Bethany. 1960 
West Hempstead, N.Y. 

Neurology 




18 




GILBERT 
LOWEXTHAL. JR. 
A.B.. Brown. 1960 
Braddock Hts., Md. 

Medicine 



JOSEPH G. McCARTHY 
A.B., Harvard. 1960 
Lowell. Mass. 
Surgery 





KEXXETH A. MARMAR 
A.B., Harvard. 1960 
Framingham Centre. Mass. 
Pediatric Surgery 



EUGEXE S. MAYER 
B.S., Tufts. 1960 
Westfield, X.J. 
Surgery 




lib 




JOHX B. MULLIKEX 
A.B.. Princeton, 1960 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Surgery 



FRAXKLIX S. 
MUSGRAVE 
B.S., Syracuse, 1958 
M.B.A., UCLA, 1959 
Marietta. Ohio 
Neurosurgery 

19 





DAVID R. NANK 
A.B., Princeton, 1960 
Mt. Clements, Mich. 
Surgery 



ROBERT T. OGAWA 
A.B., Kenyon, 1960 
Oahu, Hawaii 
Ophthalmology 





STEPHEN L. PATT 
A.B.. Harvard, 1960 
Elkins Park, Pa. 
Psych iatry 



ANTHONY P. 
PIETROPINTO 
A.B., New York University, 

1960 
New York City 
Psych iatry 





BRUCE H. PLATNIK 
A.B.. Columbia. 1960 
Jamaica, N.Y. 
Pediatrics 



CLAUDE S. POLIAKOFF 
A.B., Columbia, 1960 
Forest Hills. N.Y. 
Plastic Surgery 




20 




GEORGE F. POLINER 
A.B.. Wesleyan. 1956 
Springfield. Mass. 
Medicine 



CEDRIC W.PORTER. JR. 
A.B., Harvard, 1960 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
Surgery 





SUE C. QUINBY 
A.B., Rochester, 1960 
Little Falls, N.Y. 
Medicine 



LAWRENCE N. 
RAPPAPORT 
A.B., Harvard, 1960 
Great Neck, N.Y. 
Radiology 





MATTHEW M. RECHLER 
A.B.. Harvard. 1960 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Medicine 



WATSON D. REID 
A.B.. Yale, 1959 
Greenwich, Conn. 





PAUL PETER ROSEN 
A.B., Swarthmore, 1960 
New York City 
Pathology 



CHARLES G. REUL 
A.B., Princeton. 1960 
Westfield, N.J. 
Neurology 





JOHN W. REILLY 
A.B., Columbia. 1960 
Ft. Lee, N.J. 

Surgery 



IAN M. REISS 
A.B., Columbia, 1960 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Surgery 





THEODORE B. ROBBINS 
A.B., Harvard, 1960 

Gloucester, Mass. 
Psychiatry 



PHILIP J. ROGAL 
A.B., Princeton. 1960 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Surgery 




22 




GARY F. STEIN 
A.B.. Union, 1960 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Medicine 



WILLIAM D. STIEHM 
B.S.. Wisconsin, 1961 
Madison, Wis. 
Medicine 





J. WILLIAM STILLEY 
A.B.. Princeton, 1960 
Homestead, Pa. 
Medicine 



RONALD SCHREIBER 
A.B.. Columbia, 1961 
New York City 
Medicine 





NORMAN A. SPENCER 
A.B., Amherst, 1960 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Ophthalmology 



MICHAEL L. SANANMAN 
A.B., Swarthmore, 1960 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Neurology 




23 




PETER F. SALOMON 
A.B., Harvard, 1960 
New York City 
Surgery 



ARIANA B. STUDENTS 
A.B., Stanford, 1960 
Red Bank, N.J. 

Medicine 





C. GERALD SUNDAHL 
A.B., Princeton, 1960 
Bradford, Pa. 
Medicine 



AKEMI TAKEKOSHI 
A.B., Vassar, 1960 
Pasadena, Cal. 

Neurology 





WILLIAM R. VETTER 
A.B., Amherst, 1960 
Flushing, N.Y. 
Medicine 



STEPHEN F. WANG 
A.B., Columbia, 1960 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Medicine 




24 




ANN HEROY WEBB 
A.B.. Vassar, 1960 
Sewickley, Pa. 



CHARLES A. WEBB. JR. 
A.B., Trinity, 1960 
Baltimore, Md. 
Orthopedics 





BARRY G. WOOD 
A.B., Columbia, 1960 
New York City 

Psychiatry 



MICHAEL J. WOLK 
A.B., Colgate, 1960 
New York City 
Medicine 





EDWARD G. 

WILLIAMS, JR. 
B.S., Lehigh, 1960 
Passaic, NJ. 
Surgery 



WILLIAM R. WILSON 
A.B.. Yale, 1960 
Mahwah, N.J. 
Surgery 




25 




ANSIS ZAMELIS 

Cornell 

New York City 

General Practice 



RICHARD F. ZIPF 
A.B., Stanford, 1961 
Sacramento, Cal. 
Medicine 





PRESTON ZUCKER 
A.B., Hamilton, 1960 
New York City 
Pediatrics 



GEOFFREY B. WRIGHT 
A.B., Harvard, 1960 
Merrick, N.Y. 
Medicine 





EVELYN F. GROLLMAN 
A.B., Sarah Lawrence, 1960 
Dallas, Texas 
Medicine 



B. EDWARD 

TURVEY, JR. 
A.B., Oberlin, 1960 
Dayton, Ohio 
Medicine 




26 



ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA 




Alpha Omega Alpha is a national medical honor 
society, election to which is based upon scholar- 
ship and character. The society was founded in 
1902 by William W. Root; the chapter at the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons was organized 
in 1907. 



Juniors 

Paul D. Berk 
John B. MuUiken 
Sue C. Quinby 
Ronald Schreiber 
J. William Stilley 
Ansis Zamelis 



Seniors 



Williard E. Andrews 
Michael J. Attkiss 
Ralph S. Blume 
Frank G. deFuria 
Stephen J. Doctoroff 
Matthew M. Rechler 



Ian M. Reiss 
Philip J. Rogal 
Michael Sananman 
Ariana B. Students 
William R. Vetter 
Richard F. Zipf 



Officers 

J. William Stilley, President 
John B. Mulliken, Vice-President 
Sue C. Quinby, Secretary 



27 



INTERNSHIPS 



Williard E. Andrews, University of Minnesota Hospitals, 

Minneapolis 
William P. Arend, University of Washington Hospitals, 

Seattle 
Michael J. Attkiss, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston 
Jeanne W. Baer, Roosevelt Hospital, New York 
Bruce L. Ballard, Michael Reese Hospital, Chicago 
Howard J. Barnum, Jr., Greenwich Hospital, Greenwich, 

Conn. 
Rolf F. Bat-ili. Presbyterian Hospital, New York 
David T. Bedell, Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta 
Jose M. Berio, Jr., Roosevelt Hospital, New York 
Paul D. Berk, Presbyterian Hospital, New York 
Harris A. Herman. New England Center Hospital, Boston 
A. Kenneth Blaydow, Los Angeles County Hospital 
Ralph S. Blume, Presbyterian Hospital, New York 
Robert L. Boothe, St. Luke's Hospital, New York 
Mike M. Bronshvag, Passavant Memorial Hospital, Chicago 
John R. Brooks, Ben Taub Hospital, Houston 
Gerald D. Buker, U.S.P.H.S. Hospital, Baltimore 
A. Lawrence Cervino, University Hospitals, Cleveland 
Edmund Chaitman, St. Luke's Hospital, New York 
Peter S. Chen, Greenwich Hospital, Greenwich, Conn. 
Jack C. Childers, Jr., University of Virginia Hospital, 

Charlottesville 
David S. David, St. Luke's Hospital, New York 
Barry A. Davidson, New England Center Hospital, Boston 
Frank G. deFuria, New York Hospital, New York 
Simon H. DeMuth, University Hospitals, Cleveland 
Neil Decter, Long Island Jewish Hospital, New Hyde Park 
Thomas L. Dent, University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Stephen J. Doctoroff, Presbyterian Hospital, New York 
Patricia K. Donahoe, New England Center Hospital, Boston 
James H, Egan, Bellevue First Medical, New York 
Samuel O. Essandoh, Montefiore Hospital, New York 
David V. Forrest, St. Luke's Hospital, New York 
Walter A. Franck, University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Gerald S. Freedman, Colorado General Hospital, Denver 
Stuart Freyer, University Hospitals, Madison, Wis. 
Michael A. Friedberg, Palo Alto Stanford Hospital, Palo 

Alto, Cal. 
William G. Friend, Roosevelt Hospital, New York 
Bartley R. Frueh, North Carolina Memorial Hospital, Chapel 

Hill 
Michael L. Gelfand, Presbyterian Hospital, New York 
Howard M. Gerstel, Bellevue First Medical, New York 
Marvin S. Gilbert, Bellevue First Surgical, New York 
Daniel H. Golwyn, U.S. Naval Hospital, Philadelphia 
Thomas F. Gregg, Mary Fletcher Hospital, Burlington, Vt. 
Martin G. Groder, Maimonides Hospital, Brooklyn 
Evelyn F. Grollman, Bellevue First Medical, New York 
Lewis L. Hamilton, Bellevue First Medical, New York 
William G. Hamilton, Roosevelt Hospital, New York 
Katherine Hart, Colorado General Hospital, Denver 
Carlos L. Henriquez, Hunterdon Medical Center, Flemington, 

N.J. 
Arthur H. Hoyte, San Francisco General Hospital 
Robert H. Humphries, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York 
David D. Johnson, II, San Francisco General Hospital 
Alfred I. Kaplan, New England Center Hospital, Boston 
John G. Kauderer, Jr., University Hospitals, Columbus. Ohio 
Peter T. Kirchner, U.S. Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Md. 
J. Philip Kistler, Man' Imogene Bassett Hospital. Cooperstown, 

N.Y. 



28 



William H. Lawrence, University Hospitals, Madison, 

Wisconsin 
Leonard Leventer, Mt. Sinai Hospital, New York 
Robert D. Lewis, Roosevelt Hospital, New York 
Richard A. Lipton, University Hospital. Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Gilbert Lowenthal, Jr., Passavant Memorial Hospital, Chicago 
Kenneth A. Mannar. Boston City Hospital Fifth Surgical Div. 
Eugene S. Mayer, Presbyterian Hospital, New York 
Joseph G. McCarthy, Presbyterian Hospital, New York 
John B. Mulliken, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 
Franklin S. Musgrave, University of Kentucky Hospitals, 

Lexington 
David R. Nank, University of Washington Hospitals, Seattle 
Robert T. Ogawa, Los Angeles County Hospital 
Stephen L. Patt, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York 
Anthony Pietropinto, St. Vincent's Hospital, New York 
Bruce H. Platnik, Montefiore Hospital, New York 
Claude S. Poliakoff, Bronx Municipal Hospital, New York 
George F. Poliner, Medical College of Virginia Hospital. 

Richmond 
Cedric W. Porter, Jr., Boston City Hospital Fifth Surgical Div. 
Joseph B. Priestley, Roosevelt Hospital, New York 
Sue C. Quinby, Bronx Municipal Hospital, New Y'ork 
Lawrence N. Rappaport, Bellevue Second Medical, New York 
Matthew M. Rechler, Bronx Municipal Hospital, New York 
Watson D. Reid, Presbyterian Hospital, New York 
John W. Reilly, Bellevue First Surgical. New York 
Ian M. Reiss, Roosevelt Hospital, New York 
Charles G. Reul, North Carolina Memorial Hospital, Chapel 

Hill 
Theodore B. Robbins, St. Luke's Hospital, New York 
Philip J. Rogal, Grace New Haven Community Hospital. New 

Haven, Conn. 
Paul P. Rosen, Presbyterian Hospital. New York 
Peter F. Salomon, Bellevue First Surgical, New York 
Michael L. Sananman, University of California Hospitals, San 

Francisco 
Ronald Schreiber, Presbyterian Hospital, New York 
Norman A. Spencer, University of Virginia Hospital. Char- 
lottesville 
Gary F. Stein, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston 
William D. Stiehm, San Francisco General Hospital 
J. William Stilley, Presbyterian Hospital, New York 
Ariana B. Students, Strong Memorial Hospital. Rochester, N.Y. 
C. Gerald Sundahl, Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital. 

Cooperstown, N.Y. 
B. Edward Turvey, University Hospital, Ann Arbor. Mich. 
William R. Vetter, University of California Hospitals, San 

Francisco 
Stephen F. Wang, Boston City Hospital Fifth and Sixth 

Medical Div. 
Ann C. H. Webb, University of Virginia Hospital, Charlottes- 
ville 
Charles A. Webb, University of Virginia Hospital, 

Charlottesville 
Edward G. Williams, St. Luke's Hospital, New York 
William R. Wilson, University Hospitals. Cleveland 
Michael J. Wolk, Kings County Hospital, Brooklyn 
Barry G. Wood, Roosevelt Hospital, New York 
Geoffrey B. Wright, Michael Reese Hospital. Chicago 
Richard F. Zipf, Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester. N.Y. 
Preston Zucker, Montefiore Hospital. New York 



The Classes 

of 

1965 

1966 

1967 



ft 



i 



B 






ft 







First /?omj: Petito, Wohlauer. Second Row: Winickoff, Srodes, Pollack, Curci, Fu, Johnson, Chadbourn, Glen. Third Row: 
Kirschberg, Wilson, Shukovsky, Myers, Gise, Follows, Olds. 



First Year 



1 I! JiT 



L v r 



\ 



o i ° 1 U v 






- 




First Roiv: Howland, Cohen, Hodge, Kolman, Sherman. Olcott, Biles. Second Row: Grossman. Berger, Snyder, Tracht. Getz. 
Sellner, Garrell, DeAngelis, Heilbrunn. Third Row: McNamara, Miller, Frank. Bowen, Jones, Banvard. McKane, Winner. 
Clark. 



30 








F/rsf /?oic: Slein, Bragg, Slohne, Russell, Myers, Nakano, Blabey, Pershouse, Rohrlich. Second Row: Violin, Cohen, Rosef- 
sky, Silverstein, Waskell, Hartley, Killebrew, Pieri, Schmidt, Mackler. Morgan, Balch. Third Row: Christensen, Kuster, 
Raabe, Christensen, Gaines, Feibel, Hurd, Greenberger, Jones, Penner, Ackley. 



Class of 1967 



Bt ^ 




i f V,fk^?%l^ 




Fi>5/ /?oit: Spier, Lee, Winslow, Schneier, Hnfmann. Finkelstein, Scheinhorn. Brewster, Bragg. Second Row: Holschuh, 
Noel, Wenglin, Rodvien, Schneider, Kaiser, Nugent, Johnston, Stookey, Sweeney. Third Row: German, Andrews, Imbembo, 
Merwin, Levy, Novalis. Brensilver, Tillisch, Novak, Clark, Briley. 

31 



Second Year— Class of 1966 

— ti'ii 




First Row: Cook, Richardson. Second Row: Harris, Muller, Sah, Tholfson, Cohen, Miller, SaJand. Third Row: Sears, Max, 
Shackman, Rowe, Pupio, Tucker, Wheeler, Tavernetti, Molavi, Drusen. 



Third Year— Class of 1965 




First Row: Hadden, Davis, St. John, Bluming, Schurman, Johnson, Condon, Delbanco, Faulk. Second Row: Weld, O'Brien. 
Schacter, Carida, Schuker, Taylor, Miller, Langloh. Stanley, Svahn. Third Row: Ackley, Garfein, Longstreth, Keester, Sim- 
mons, Iseman, Peterson, Bergsma, Bohnen, Lambert, Merry, Lyden, Ginsberg, Kripke. 



32 



Faculty 

and 

Administration 




33 



Administration 




H. HOUSTON MERRITT 

Vice President in Charge of Medical Affairs 
Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 



34 




GEORGE A. PERERA 

Associate Dean 





PATRICK HAYES 

Director of Bard Hall 



EDWIN M. BARTON 

Director of Student Activities and the 
P&SClub 



35 




Clockwise: WILFRED COPEN- 
HAVER: The unexamined life is not 
worth living. GEORGE PAPPAS: 
The a-a-a-a interdigitations a-a-a . . . 
MELVIN MOSS: A toothy matter. 
DOROTHY JOHNSON: I think it's 
good reading. HERBERT ELFTMAN: 
Scutch. MALCOLM CARPENTER: 
He who hesitates is lost. CHARLES 
NOBACK: The reticular activating 
system must be in here somewhere. 
Center: CHARLES ELY and AL- 
BERT: Oops. 







m 



ANATOMY 



- * 



m 


^ nd 




36 




BIOCHEMISTRY 



C-6 

H-A 

A* ^-DNA 

R *?^ 



OH 

(fi 



ACH! 

M 

A 

N 

S-OH 



C 

A 

dnja JL ' \ 

£ E\ E M +acetyuN 

£ wrW CHOLm£ ^ 

CHOLIN 



8/££ 



^p.^ Blood 

p« e s 




ESTERASE. 
1 + GEIGER 

v counter 
£n berg 



O >^. 1OO0A. 

-CI&AR\/ 

-GEI6ERVRYP5IN 

A 



N 
I 
V 



+ENTRO> , 
PY K A 



^ KRA.W 





37 



p 

H 
Y 

S 
I 

o 

L 
O 
G 
Y 




Above left: JOHN TAGGART: Briefly reviewing the past ten years . . . 
Above center: WILLIAM NASTUK: It's as simple as A Ch. Right: LOUIS 
CIZEK: Going into the ninth inning . . . 




Above: MERO NOCENTI: I want to hold that 
gland. Right: WILLIAM WALCOTT: Can you 
treat congestive heart failure using Poiseuille's 
law? 





Left: WALTER ROOT: Where's the men's 
room? Right: MAGNUS GREGERSEN: 
Claude Bernard and I . . . 




38 




PHARMACOLOGY 



Above: WILBUR SAWYER: It needs a pinch of salt. Above right: 
SHIH-CHUN WANG: Hey boy, how you pass physiology? 





Above: FREDERICK HOFMANN: Want a fix? Above right: 
HARRY VAN DYKE: The correct choice was false-false 
related. Right: HERBERT BARTELSTONE: Sorry. I tipped 
off the dental students. 




39 




PATHOLOGY 




Left and above: DONALD McKAY, Francis Dela- 
field Professor of Pathology: Personally. I like 
the picture on the left better. 




Above: VIRGINIA KNEELAND FRANTZ: As my brother would 
say, well! Right: WILLIAM BLANC: In ze Swiss literature .... 




) 



40 




Above: RAFFAELE LATTES: However the Italian literature 
says . . . Right: ABXER WOLF: His two remaining Betz 
cells are connected with a spirochete. 





Left: NATHAN LANE: Don't fracture the mitochondria. Below: 
DAVID SPIRO: Back at the MCH. I mean the GMH, I mean the 
MGH 




41 



MICROBIOLOGY 






Left: HARRY ROSE, John E. Borne Professor of Micro- 
biology: Incidentally, who was John E. Borne? Above: GAB- 
RIEL GODMAN: I'm really a pathologist but don't tell any- 



Left: BEATRICE SEEGAL: It's a 
shame he has nephritis. Right: 
ELVIN KABAT: For 50% of the pool, 
you'll be first this week! 



Left: HAROLD BROWN: Don't sit on the stools 
in my lab. Right: CALDERON HOWE: You're 
sure it's a BFP? 




42 



MEDICINE 





Left: STANLEY BRADLEY, Samuel Bard Professor of Medicine: The 
mind boggles at the thought. /(We: CHARLES RAGAN. Samuel W. 
Lambert Professor of Medicine: Just because I like it up here, Stan. 





Above left: SIDNEY WERNER: Can you recommend a good book on the thyroid? Left: 
HELEN ANDERSON: Oh yeah, who says so? Above: FREDERICK BAILEY: Lubafax, 
please. Right: ALFRED GELLHORN: Not all professors wear white coats. Above right: 
ROBERT DARLING, Simon Baruch Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: 
I missed you last Wednesday. 



43 





^^^ 








■ i 






1 






^ ^J 








-si 




\ A 






V; 


. 


^f\ 




> 


"1 


|\ fe^ 






Left: DONALD TAPLEY: A man more sinned against than sin- 
ning. Below: ANDRE COURNAND: Let me tell you about Stock- 
holm. 




Left: YALE KNEELAND: Percuss with elegance. 
Center: KERMIT PINES: It's not that I can't open 
it, it's just that I don't. Right: REJANE HARVEY: 
An affair of the heart. 






44 





Left: DANA ATCHLEY: Despite the management, it was a rapid down- 
hill course. Above: RICHARD STOCK: Convert fibrillation before 
euthyroid? Lower left: HAMILTON SOUTHWORTH: Pandora has 
nothing on me. Upper center: ELLIOTT OSSERMAN: Alpha-2 minus 
Beta-1 equals what? Lower center: MRS. LANG: They not only look 
funny, they smell funny. Lower right: DAVID SCHACHTER: Two heads 
are better than one. 







45 





Above left: GEORGE PERERA: The Crisco Kid. Above right: CHARLES 
CHRISTIAN: Knobby knees? Left: ALBERT LAMB. He guards P & S 
health. Lower left: CHARLES FLOOD: Meet me at the chocolate speed- 
way. Lower right: STUART COSGRIFF: Is that right. 






Above left: ALFRED FISHMAN: I don't 
believe it but I'll have to agree with the 
pathologist. Above right: ARTHUR 
WERTHEIM: You boys don't want to 
hear me talk. Left: JOHN ULTMANN: 
I'll meet you at 8:24:30 AM on the dot. 
Right: JOHN LARAGH: I'll listen if 
you're sure it's a gallop. Lower left: 
HENRY ARANOW: Don't tap the thy- 
roid with the hammer. Lower right: 
DICKINSON RICHARDS: Back at the 
C6 lab 




! 



I 









47 




Above: GERARD TURINO: Al said to 
smile. 





Above: GLENN LANGER: Fibro-musculo- 
collageno-cysto-carditis? Left: JAY MELT- 
j ZER: What do you mean, normal liver again? 




Left: DAVID SEEGAL: A 
happy apple. Right: ALBERT 
GROKOEST: Now think of it 
my way. 




Left: FELIX DEMARTINI: What's this joint Christian's talking about? Center: IRENE FERRER: Mind your P's and Q's. Right: NICH- 
OLAS CHRISTY: They call me J.C? 




I 





SURGERY 





Left: GEORGE HUMPHREYS II, Valentine Mott Professor of Surg- 
ery: Even the residents couldn't pass it. Above: DAVID HABIF: 
It's never too late to learn. 



C < v 




1 



-— - -Ji 





Above left: HAROLD BARKER: There is a 
point of irreversibility. Above center: SHIV- 
AJI BHONSLAY: The Bengal Lancer. 
Above right: ROBERT WYLIE: You'd 
agree, wouldn't you Max? Left: ROBERT 
ELLIOTT. A lump in your throat? Right: 
HUGH AUCHINCLOSS: Meanwhile, back 
at Hammersmith .... 





49 



-5 ■• 


I 


■H^^r 




^^r 


1 


k 1 


'\ 


l]k , * 





Above: ROBERT HIATT: Now show the class your colostomy. Above 
right: ARTHUR VOORHEES: Look at him, he's holding a pencil. 
Right: JOHN PRUDDEN: What canary? Below left: JOSE FERRER: 
It's about all this lunch in lecture. Below right: JAMES MALM: I'm 
the greatest. 





50 





IHft fct 







Above left: PHILIP WIEDEL: All my bow ties are at (he 
cleaner's. Above: MILTON PORTER: There's a trick to this. 
Left: GEORGE CRIKELAIR: You want it longer? Below 
left: GRANT SANGER: I prefer it with a little powder 
sprinkled on. Below center: CARL FEIND: It is a little out of 
my field. Below: CUSHMAN HAAGENSEN: You happen to 
be referring to the criteria. 



k 



\ 



K 





fv -jJi 





51 




Above: THOMAS SANTULLI: Upset stomach got you out of focus? Right: 
EDMUND GOODMAN: Don't block my rays, Philip. Right below: JOHN 
SCUDDER: Out, out, damned spot. 




ANESTHESIOLOGY 







Above: EMANUEL PAPPER: I'm not sure anyone would read 
it if we didn't lend it out. Right: RICHARD KITZ: These mechan- 
ical gadgets never fail to amaze me. 





52 




Left: SHIH-HSUN NGAI: No. the name 
is Dr. Ngai, not Dr. No. 



UROLOGY 





Above: HANS ZINSSER: What would you do with two million dollars? 
Above right: JOHN LATTIMER: You've gotta have a gimmick. Right: 
TIMOTHY DONOVAN: Who said cystoscopy hurt? 




53 




Left: LAWRENCE KOLB: In my book that's 
perversion. Above: HILDE BRUCH: I grew a stick' 
once. Below: ISRAEL KESSELBRENNER: O.K. 
Rabbi, do your stuff. 





Above: DONALD KORNFELD: We all 
are, you know. Left: PHILIP POLATIN: 
Pseudo - pseudo-affective-pseudo-psychotic 
pseudo-normalcy. Right: SHERYERT 
FRAZIER: Now that it's all taped I'm leav- 




54 







Top left: WILLIAM LANGFORD: That ought to hold 
the little brats. Top right: WILLIAM HORWITZ: 
Shock, lock, crock, sock, mock, block . . . Above: 
DONALD DUNTON: Beware the jabberwock my son. 
Above right: GEORGE WILKIE: !!!@&#**@?##!! 
Right: SIDNEY MALITZ: Heh heh heh. 




55 



OB-GYN 





Left: HOWARD TAYLOR: What do you mean it was too 
slippery to hang onto? Above: LANDRUM SHETTLES: I'll 
race you to the ova. 







Above left: HAROLD SPEERT: Don't believe every- 
thing you read around here. Above center: ALBERT 
PLENTL: More fun than a monkey box. Above right: 
ANNA SOUTHAM: The sperm count is negative. 
Left: SAUL GUSBERG: A little radium never hurt 
anyone. RAYMOND VANDE WIELE: Shall we try 
for quints? 




I 




56 





Above left: DUANE TODD: L-R- 
R-P. Above right: GILBERT VOS- 
Bl'RGH: That side of the placenta 
isn't my field. Right: WILLIAM CAV- 
ANAGH: A ring around the rosey. 





Left: ROBERT HALL: And you can use them for Christmas decorations. Above 
right: ANTHONY D'ESOPO: Every day is labor day with me. Below: CHARLES 
STEER: Attkiss, get back here!! 




57 



RADIOLOGY 





V 



^ 



Top left: JUAN TAVERAS: It's somewhere in the squash. Top 
right: WILLIAM SEAMAN: Barium going up the esophagus? 
Above: RALPH SCHLAEGER: You say the rent is going up at 
Bard Hall? Above right: KENT ELLIS: He went into congestive 
failure after how much dye? Right: DAVID BAKER: I'm sorry, 
Hattie, but it looks like pneumonia. 




58 








I 



Top: FRANK STINCHFIELD: Back in 
Iowa . . . Center: HARRISON Mc- 
LALGHLIN: AB&G? Bottom: LEON- 
IDAS LANTZOUNIS: Use both feets. 






yj^ 



Top: SAWNIE GASTON: Meet me at the 
crossroads. Center: CHARLES NEER: 
We fused CI to L4. Bottom: FRED- 
ERICK CRAIG: What's ceruloplas- 
min? 



r \ i 



Top: ANDREW BASSETT: Bone minus 
air equals cartilage. Center: ALEXAN- 
DER GARCIA: The name is familiar. 
Bottom: HALFORD HALLOCK: The 
name is not hallux. 



ORTHOPEDICS 



59 



DERMATOLOGY 




Left: LEO SCHWEIK: Have gumma 
drop, will travel. Right: CARL NEL- 
SON: There'll be a lot of people at 
Staten Island in June. 



r 




i 



OPHTHALMOLOGY 



IN MEMORIAM 





Above: GERARD DE VOE, Edward S. Harkness Pro- 
fessor of Ophthalmology: The eyes have it. 



CHARLES F. POST 




Left: PHILIP LOW ENFISH: Mr. Quart- 
erback, define radiate. Right: CHARLES 
PERERA: What's Crisco? 




60 



ENT-PUBLIC HEALTH 



IN MEMORIAM 



r 



r 




Abate: MILOS BASEK: The 
name's Basek, not Bilchick. 
Right: JULES WALTNER: 
That's Budapest on the left. 
Belou: BELA MARQUIT: I 
got it from Phil Wiedel. 




EDMUND P. FOWLER 





Above: ROBERT HLT: New nose is good news. 




Right: LEONARD GOLDWATER: Cousin 
Barry disapproves of sociaJized medicine. 



m 




Q 



i . 



\ 



61 



PEDIATRICS 





Left: EDWARD CURNEN, Reuben S. Carpentier Professor of Pediatrics: 
Why not call it Curnen B? Above center: HATTIE ALEXANDER: You 
have ten seconds to say something significant. Above right: WILLIAM 
BAUMAN: A juvenile crock? 




Above left: HERBERT COHEN: Cystic fibrosis is no sweat. Above right: 
DOUGLAS DAMROSCH: Someone has to treat the whole child. Left: 
SIDNEY BLUMENTHAL: Rapid digitalization with leaf? 



62 







tmk^ 






J) 



\ 



.-i6oi>e /e/c GILBERT MELLIN: Thank you, it's 
my baby picture. Above center: WILLIAM SILVER- 
MAN: They're cutest when they're young. Above 
right: MELVTN GRUMBACH: How many X's? 
Left: JOHN BRUSH: My favorite agents were 
taken off the market. Right: JAMES WOLFF: Try 
Geritol. 





Above: RUTH HARRIS: I look on this 
with a jaundiced eye. 



Below: ROBERT WINTERS: Sodium up one- 
eighth, you say? 




63 



NEUROLOGY 
E ■ 




Right: PAUL HOEFER: Der is urine on 
das bed. Far right: MELVIN YAHR: She 
said she never had diplopia until she lalked 
to me today. 



WE 
SAW 

YOU 



CAMERA ROUNDS 
AND COMMENT 
WITH THE 
1964 YEARBOOK STAFF 



65 




CHRONICKLE 

In the yeare of our Lord nineteen hundred 
sixty, a bande of hearty younge men & wo- 
men came to the greate Medickalle Centre, 
a place wherein dwelt a plantitude of sicke 
patients & teachers. They came from places 
of learning throughout the 
countrie where, at greate 
riske to theire emb jnick 
intelleckts, they had fought 
theire waye to the fore in 
order that they might 
labour at the great Med- 
ickalle Centre. & greate 
was theire joie, for they 
wouldst no more need 
worke in smellie chem- 
isterie laboratories & 
cleave foule tissues in 
longe white coates — now, 
they couldst worke in 
smellie chemisterie labora- 
tories & cleave foule tis- 
sues in shorte white 
coates. To record theire 
wonderous deeds & tri- 
umphs, this chronickle is 
set forth, that they might 

notte be soone forgotten. 
Straunge & wonderous 

were the lords whom they 

served in the first yeare, & 

most straunge of all was 

he called David, for he was 

a small but mighty manne 

who procklaimed himself 

to be friend to all stu- 
dents when he was notte 

causing them to faille his 




Above: Phil Roga] checking the bulletin board. 



Above 
Harri: 



left: Ariana Students relaxing with a cup of coffee. 
Berman entertain at the Bard Hall Steinway. 




Above right: Bruce Ballard and 




Above: On the way to the 
Grand Old Opry with Mike 
Friedberg, Norm Spencer. 
Evelyn Groliman. Dick Lip- 
ton, and Stu Rose. Left: 
Chuck Reul and Paul 
Rosen in the Espresso 
Shop. 



66 



CLASS 
SHOW 












67 



course. His vassals all 
spake a straunge Germanic 
tongue to the students who 
gathered each day in a 
circular halle to hark to 
the circular discourse. 
& many months later, a 
brighte student opened a 
booke and found all that 
the instrucktors spake to 
be writ therein in lucid 
English, but stille no on 
couldst understand a 
worde of itte — so the stu- 
dents shutte theire bookes 
& nevermore opened on 
again. In laboratories the 
students ackomplished 
theire worke despite all 
hindrances of a troll 
named Rudie, who sought 
to keepe them from using 
any & all apparatus. Notte 
wishing to overburden the 
students' fraille minds with 
ponderous anatomie, the 
wise facultie started them 
with microanatomie, more 
compatible with theire in- 
tellects. The students 
diligently peered through 
tubes for hours & listened 
to ten minute lecktures 
given from 9 to 10 o'clock 
each daye by the venerable 
chairmanne. Create was 
theire sorrowe when they 
finally learned that a mi- 



croscope had to be of the 
elecktron variety to be of 
any value, & that theire 
archaic instruments were 
worthlesse. Many students 
dwelt in a greate halle on 
the banke of a river, and 
when each battle with the 
facultie oer, the students 
wouldst gather therein 
with theire foes & make 
peace oer the wassail bowl 
& drink to celebrate theire 
vicktories. Those who had 
been defeated because they 
had notte remembered 
such information demanded 
by theire adversaries 
wouldst drinke to forgette 
that they forgotte. & be- 
tween battles, when they 
couldst notte drinke the 
facultie at the greate halle, 
the students wouldst drinke 
with the maidens who dwelt 
in Maxwelle Halle at the 
Tropickalle Gardens, 
wherein the drinke was 
more expensive, butte 
where the companie was 
freer. 

& during the winter of 
that year, they sharpened 
theire blades & plugged 
theire nostrils & entered 
the anatomie laboratorie, 
presided oer by a giant 
who had once been a den- 




Above: Dr. Tapley and Dan Golwyn imbibe ot tbe weed. 



68 




Above: A drug company tour with Jim Malm, Pete Tsares. Larry 
Rappaport, Joe McCarthy, Mrs. Wang, John Reilly, Claude Polia- 
koff, Al Kaplan, Geoff Wright, and Phil Kistler. 




Above: Al Kaplan giving a pointer on how to do a better guaiac test. Above center: Sam Es- 
sandoh. Neil Decter, and Dr. Kritzler study a chart on rounds. Above right: Jim Barnum 
strikes an executive pose. 





Above left: Drs. Buchanan and Kneeland get together on a Monday noon 
CPC. Above right: Mike Wolk at the end of a day. 



69 



tist, butte who founde his 
present pain-giving rela- 
tionshippe with the stu- 
dents more rewarding. 
There was a droll keeper of 
the cadavers, who, it is 
reported, kept his charges 
preserved by breathing 
on them. & there was a 
straunge gentlemanne who 
searched for strucktures 
with telescopes oer his 
eies & once actuallie 
founde a legge. Butte the 
students were righte mer- 
rie, for itte is a thinge of 
greate status to have a 
cadaver & to impresse 
comrades in graduate 
skooles with & to take 
faire maidens to see when 
touring the medickalle 
skoole at nighte. Verily, 
owning a cadaver gives a 
student a certaine indis- 
putable aire. 

& there was a neuroan- 
atomie department whiche 
broke down the nervous 
system for the students: 
Instrucktors wouldst leck- 
ture outte of Strongge & 
Elwinne or Lewis Carrolle 
indisckriminately. One 
docktor wouldst say al- 
ways, "Twill all come 
cleare in the ende," whiche 
itte did in no waye do. 



There was also a docktor 
of the minde who wouldst 
leckture about normaile 
development which made 
the students feele verie 
abnormalle, indeede. There 
were lecktures on statis- 
ticks, geneticks, & embry- 
ologie, whiche bore no re- 
lationshippe to each other 
nor to anythinge else. 

& itte came to passe to 
those students who came 
to passe that they were as- 
sailed by the departement 
of microbiologic whiche 
ecksposed them to all 
manner of disease-produc- 
ing organisms, wilde ro- 
dents, hypodermick need- 
les, and the worst evil of 
all, lecktures on immuno- 
chemistrie. Butte the stu- 
dents were righte merrie, 
for they no longer needed 
listen to folke with straunge 
German accents talke 
about straunge compoundes 
in biochemistrie — instead, 
they listened to folke with 
straunge Chinese accents 
talke about straunge com- 
poundes in pharmacologic 
& instead of labouring in 
laboratories, they couldst 
sit on theire ischial tuber- 
osities & witness experi- 
mentes on the magical tel- 







3W! 



* If*. r v» 




^Q * fc4 



V 



Above: Roof time at Bard Hal] — Dave Nank, Mike Friedberg, Dave Forrest, Larry Cervino, 
Charlie Parsons, and Bill Friend. 





Above left: Clerk At Work— Ian Reiss. Above right: Getting plastered in orthopedics are 
Ted Robbins, Larry Cervino, and Wally Franck. 




Above: On the Rock: Sam Essandoh, Gene Mayer, Bill Stilley, Dr. David Seegal. 
Paul Berk, and Joe McCarthy. 



70 



Internship Party 





Above left: Bill Lawrence, Ken Marmar, and Richard Zipf in thoughtful moods. Above 
right: Tom Gregg. Ann Brower Culver. Bob Lewis, and Penny Post in spirited discussion. 





Above left: Stu Freyer and Steve Patt. Above right: Jack and Pat Donahoe celebrate 
the return to Boston. 





Above left: Jim Egan. Lew Hamilton, and Mike Wolk thinking of the day's coup. Above 
right: What's up. Doc? Barb Satir and Steve Doctoroff. Below left: Rolf Barth. Dan and 
Mary Jane Golwyn. Below right: Pete Salomon and Jane London. 





evision skreene — & on 
frequent occasions when 
the experimentes failled, 
the students muttered 
gravely, "Marry, tis ye 
showe business!" Sir Don- 
ald, of the silver dragon 
creste, introduced the stu- 
dents to the halle of path- 
ologie, home of the ather- 
oma, carcinoma, & foule 
aroma. 

& at longe laste, the stu- 
dents, who had come to 
medickalle skoole nearly 
two yeares before, were in- 
troduced to medicine by a 
grande olde manne of 
medicine. Itte was Sir 
Yale who, with Lord Harry 
of the Roses, was one of the 
few folke who stille be- 
lieved disease to be caused 
by infectious agentes, notte 
by autoimmunitie. The stu- 
dents were presented with 
stethescopes by theire 
greate benefacktor, Eli 
Lilly, and journied forth to 
a isle where all manner of 
patients with interesting 
physickalle findings were 
sent to be ecksamined by 
medickalle students. From 
that moment on all manner 
of patients addressed stu- 
dents as docktor and the 
students were treated with 



respeckte and dignitie 
ecksept by the facultie. 

They wente forth into the 
pediatrick wardes wherein 
they learned to chaunge 
diapers, avoide kickinge 
feete, prescribe orange 
juice, and fende off the 
monstrous mothers. They 
plastered eache other in 
orthopedicks & then got 
themselfes plastered at the 
Tropickalle Gardens. They 
spake to patients at the 
Psykiatrick Institute, 
where the patients knew 
that they were butte med- 
ickalle students & ackted 
ackordingly superior. They 
wente to specialtie clinicks 
to learne about such fas- 
cinating diseases as acne, 
tonsillitis, and myopia. 
They wente to noone leck- 
tures, those who liked en- 
tertainement with theire 
repastes. & they partooke 
of ye researche eleck- 
tives, knowne to other 
folke at the Centre as 
paide vacations. 

Most greate of all, they 
rose to the ecksalted 
rankes of the clinickalle 
clarks. They were en- 
trusted with suche grave 
responsibilities as bleeding 
the patients, testing urine, 




Above: Profiles of Claude 
Poliakoff, Tom Gregg. Dave 
Forrest, and Dave Bedell. 
Left: Tom Dent discussing 
an EKG with Dr. Irene Fer- 
rer on the Bellevue Medical 
clerkship. 





■UI../V 


fPHHH 





Above left: Friday morning ferry ride — Bill 
Arend, Bill Stilley, Joe McCarthy, Steve Patt, 
Gerry Freedman. Marty Groder and Bruce 
Ballard. Left: Meanwhile, back at PH Derm 
were Storey Musgrave, Rolf Barth, Evelyn Groll- 
man, Kate Hart, Preston Zucker. Watson Reid, 
Rich Zipf, and Lenny Leventer. Above right: 
A pole-pushing lesson being taught by Whitey 
Zamelis and Carlos Henriquez. 



72 




Above: Bruce Platnik feels very sorry that another clerk got 
his patient in Group Clinic from Mrs. Townsend. 




Above: PH medical rounds. Bill Hamilton, Dr. Kritzler, Sam 
Essandoh, Dr. Frank Rees Smith, Bill Stiehm, Neil Decter, 
and unidentified nursoblast. 





Above left: John Mulliken pastes in an EKG — all part of the learning experience. Above right: 
Gary Stein dispensing medicine at the Firestone Hospital on the tropical medicine elective. 



73 



& ecksamining the feces, 
suche tasks (knowne as 
ye skutte) otherwise en- 
trusted only to highly-paide 
high-skoole graduates 
called tecknicians. Theire 
other duties inckluded con- 
soling the internes (for 
itte is writ in soothe, "Mis- 
erie loves companie, es- 
peciallie before dawn"), ad- 
miring the residentes (who 
spake greate soothes writ 
down in obskure journ- 
alles) and giving greate 
homage to the ruler-of-rul- 
ers, the chairmanne of the 
departement of medicine, 
Kinge Stanley. For hi 
clarks laboured to produce 
colorfulle masterworkes of 
arte (chartes) and longe 
inckantations (presenta- 
tions) for to winne his favor 
(ye passe). And there was a 
venerable olde docktor 
who spake e^che weeke to 
the students concerning 
theire histoire-writing & he 
undoubtedly saide many 
profounde & complecks 
thinges, for indeede, no 
one couldst reckalle a 
single one of them. 

With neither warning nor 
vacation they were fourth 
yeare students & wente 
forth into Groupe Clinick 



to treate patients with ye 
most obsckure ailements 
that defied diagnosis, being 
marked by generalized dis- 
comfiture, greate anxiety, 
normalle laboratorie val- 
ues, & therefore being 
termed functionalle com- 
plaintes. They wente to 
orthopedick clinick wherein 
they ecksamined bones, 
dermatologie clinick where- 
in they ecksamined skin, & 
ante-partum clinick where- 
in they ecksamined ante- 
partums. They visited the 
Deane, who smiled broadly 
at one & all, & tolde them 
that they were righte fine 
students & wouldst all re- 
ceive interneshippes at 
verie wonderfulle hos- 
pitalles. & they worked 
with greate zeale, ecksam- 
ining in the ecksamining 
roomes, labouring in the 
labour roomes, operating 
in the operating roomes, 
and resting in the lounges. 
They wente forth to other 
hospitalles to spreade 
theire knowledge & to 
serve as sub-internes, a 
position in all respecktes 
equalle to an interneshippe, 
save in the matter of salarie 
. . . to Goldwater they 
journied, likewise to Coop- 




Above: Welcome to America, Doctor. 
Bill Stiehm and Marty Groder on the 
Staten Island ferry. Left: Bill Stilley, 
Ron Schreiber. and Bill Arend enjoy 
poker during a free moment in the 
OB call room. 



wU 





Above: Waiting for the Monday noon CPC. 
Left: Bill Lawrence and Bruce Ballard playing 
catch. 



74 




Left: Tony Pietropinto and Rich Zipf 
seen in a third year clerk's gathering. 
Above: Someone knows the answer. 
Ken Marmar, Dave Nank, Ted Robbins, 
Bruce Platnik, Anne Brower, Marty 
Groder, Pete Salomon. 




Above: Dr. Hans Popper and Gerry Sundahl dis- 
cuss Path. Left: Bob Humphries presents in 
Peds. 





r " 



Above: Readers wiil note the detail of this X- 
ray. Larry Cervino in orthopedics. Above left: 
Dick Lipton with the after-effects of Medicine. 
Left: Gene Mayer caught in the act with the 
class' money by Bill Lawrence 



75 



erstown, South Amerika, & 
even Afrika; verily, they 
wente everywhere, save to 
Combined Clinicks. 

& all returned to theire 
beloved medickalle skool 
for graduation eckcersises, 
to swear ye sacred oathe to 
ye unknowne goddes & 
goddesses (unknowne be- 
cause pre-medickalle stu- 
dents do notte studie ye 
classicks anymore), the 
oathe kepte by all physic- 
ians, save those who charge 
tuition to ye sonnes of 
physicians or who use ye in- 
tra-uterine pessaries in 
the clinick. & the students, 
now true docktors, had 
greate celebration & quaf- 
fed greate quantities of 
spirites, for they had 
learned welle that "Of ye 
most high cometh heal- 
inge." 

& so, by the grace of 
Godde, endes our chron- 
ickle, whiche telles how 
the greate classe of nine- 
teen hundred sixty four be- 
came physicians who wille 
spende the reste of theire 
lives caringe for ye sicke 
& infirm. Godde save us all. 



—Anthony 
Pietropinto 




76 



SPONSORS 



Dr. David L. Andrews 
Dr. Dana W. Atchley 
Dr. Frederick R. Bailey 
Dr. Milos Basek 
Dr. William A. Bauman 
Dr. Everett C. Bragg 
Dr. Hilde Bruch 
Dr. Howard G. Bruenn 
Dr. George A. Carden 
Dr. William V. Cavanagh 
Dr. Wilfred M. Copenhaver 
Dr. James W. Correll 
Dr. Stuart W. Cosgriff 
Dr. George F. Crikelair 
Dr. Edward C. Curnen 
Dr. Douglas S. Damrosch 
Dr. Robert C. Darling 
Dr. Archie L. Dean 
Dr. A. Gerard DeVoe 
Dr. Robert H. E. Elliott, Jr. 
Dr. Charles A. Flood 
Dr. Julian M. Freston 
Dr. Harry M. Fritts 
Dr. Alexander Garcia 
Dr. Arnold P. Gold 
Dr. Edmund N. Goodman 
Dr. Albert W. Grokoest 
Dr. David V. Habif 
Dr. Frederick P. Herter 
Dr. Robert B. Hiatt 
Dr. Paul F. A. Hoefer 
Dr. Brian F. Hoffman 
Dr. William A. Horwitz 
Dr. Edgar M. Housepian 
Dr. Robert M. Hui 
Dr. George H. Humphreys 
Dr. Harold W. Jacox 
Dr. David M. C. Ju 
Dr. Elvin A. Kabat 
Dr. Yale Kneeiand, Jr. 
Dr. Lawrence C. Kolb 
Dr. Donald S. Kornfeld 



Dr. John H. Laragh 

Dr. Raffaele Lattes 

Dr. John K. Lattimer 

Dr. Edgar Leifer 

Dr. Stanley Lesse 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert F. Loeb 

Dr. Donald G. McKay 

Dr. Sidney Malitz 

Dr. Alfred M. Markowitz 

Dr. George R. Merriam 

Dr. H. Houston Merritt 

Dr. Charles S. Neer II 

Dr. S. H. Ngai 

Dr. Charles A. Perera 

Dr. George A. Perera 

Dr. Philip Polatin 

Dr. J. Lawrence Pool 

Dr. Milton R. Porter 

Dr. John F. Prudden 

Dr. Charles A. Ragan 

Dr. Dickinson W. Richards 

Dr. Harry M. Rose 

Dr. Grant Sanger 

Dr. Thomas V. Santulli 

Dr. William B. Seaman 

Dr. David Seegal 

Dr. Beatrice C. Seegal 

Dr. Anna L. Southam 

Dr. Frank E. Stinchfield 

Dr. Francis C. Symonds 

Dr. John V. Taggart 

Dr. Howard C. Taylor, Jr. 

Dr. Ray E. Trussell 

Dr. Raymond Vande Wiele 

Dr. Carmine T. Vicale 

Dr. Jules G. Waltner 

Dr. S. C. Wang 

Dr. Arthur R. Wertheim 

Dr. Susan Williamson 

Dr. James N. Worcester 

Dr. Hans H. Zinsser 



77 




Surveying village health needs, an SK&F Foreign Fellow examines a child in 
Kurali, near New Delhi, India. 



INDIA... 
TANGANYIKA... 

IRAN... 
GUATEMALA... 



At hospitals and medical outposts a long way from 
the classroom, medical students learn to cope with 
unfamiliar diseases; help to provide much-needed 
medical services to people in underdeveloped areas of 
the world; and contribute to international under- 
standing and good will. 

This unusual opportunity to work and study in for- 
eign countries is offered to students through the 
Foreign Fellowships Program of Smith Kline & French 
Laboratories. Administered by the Association of 
American Medical Colleges, the program has enabled 
123 students to work in 40 different countries during 
the past four years. Junior and senior medical stu- 
dents are eligible to apply for Fellowships, which 
provide for an average of 12 weeks' work abroad to 
be completed before internship. 

Students who are interested in Fellowships should 
apply through the deans of their schools. 

Smith Kline & French Laboratories 



78 



Compliments of 

CARVEL 

Featuring 36 Home Made Ice Creams 

And Ice Cream Cakes For All Occasions 

1154 St. Nicholas Are. opp. The Medical Center 


ELITE FRENCH CLEANERS 

ONE HOUR SERVICE 

EXPERT TAILORING 

Work Done on the Premises - We Pick Up & Deliver 

4057 Broadway bet. 170th & 171st Sts. 
Tel.: WA. 7-5872 


Tel: LO. 8-1230 

OLYMPIC BARBER SHOP 

NICK TSAKIRIDIS 

4021 Broadway New York 32 
Bet. 169th and 170th Sts. 


HEIGHTS <> r , 

Camera Center 

The Leading Brands In Photographic 
Equipment And Supplies 

AT SPECIAL PRICES 

The Finest Quality In Photo Finishing 
Done On Premises 

1229 ST. NICHOLAS AVENUE 
Bet. 171st and 172nd Sts. 

NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 

WA. 3-3698 


TROPICAL 
GARDENS 

ON BROADWAY 

Bet. 169th and 170th Streets 

WA. 3-891 8 


KRAMER 
SURGICAL STORES 
SCIENTIFIC CORP. 

544 West 168th Street 
New York 32, N.Y. 


Vic. Greenebaum, Inc. 

HABERDASHER 

lady manhattan 
manhattan shirts 
McGregor sportswear 
interwoven hose 
truval shirts 

4009 Broadway WA. 3-4220 

Professional Discount 



79 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

SCHERING 

CORPORATION 




80 




TUfM/i fat ktftd. voMjui V) (kL$Mi> 









M%W^fl4 \J(M \hkTwd 




M 



,) 



81 



Armory Restaurant 


Compliments of 


FINE AMERICAN - ITALIAN FOOD 


/^L^~l^\ 




^Tjffi BRIDGE 


Newly Redecorated Dining Room 


APARTMENTS 


4001 Broadway bet. 168th & 169th Sts. 




WA. 3-9034 


Overlooking the Hudson at the Manhattan 


- 


Approach to the George Washington Bridge 


UPTOWN 


An Historic 
Achievement by 

1 




Wines & Liquor Store 

Incorporated 
4033 Broadway at 170 Street 




I 


i . 1 MSt*fktrk>** 


| -'W M x « I.UM-L-'^ /- 








New York 32, New York 


Renting Office - 1379 St. Nicholas Avenue 


LO. 8-2100 


SW. 5-9300 




SELBY L. TURNER 




Life Membership in Leader's Association 


KEEFE*KEEFE 


Specialist In 
INSURANCE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEN 


INCORPORATED 


233 Broadway, New York 7, N.Y. 




BEekman 3-6620 


429 EAST 75th STREET 




Best Wishes to the Class of 1964 


NEW YORK 21, NEW YORK 


Your Friendly Luncheonette 


YUkon 8-8800 


TRUE HOMEMADE COOKING 
Between Bunger's and Frenk's on 


AMBULANCES 


Fort Washington Avenue at 169th St. 


For Prompt Call and Delivery Service 
Call WAshington Heights 7-3884 




J. FREN K 




EXPERT TAILOR, CLEANERS and DYERS 



82 



With the Compliments of 

SANDOZ PHARMACEUTICALS 




Division of Sandoz, Inc. 

HANOVER, NEW JERSEY 



The 

clear 
conclusion 

from 
10 years' 
experience.. 




belongs in every practice 

Miltown 

(meprobamate) 

#. 

WALLACE LABORATORIES/Cranbury, N. J. 
84 




BUILDERS 



NEW YORK 



SAN JUAN 



WASHINGTON 



LOS ANGELES 



Sponsors 



DR. HENRY ARANOW 
DR. ANDRE COURNAND 
DR. CALDERON HOWE 
DR. HARRY W. FRITTS 
DR. CARL R. FEIND 
DR. ORLANDO J. MILLER 
DR. JULIAN M. FRESTON 
DR. JAMES N. WORCESTER 



85 




86 



Luigi's Restaurant & Bar 


24-HOUR KODACHROME SERVICE 


WASHINGTON HEIGHTS 


Morris Camera Shop 


LEADING ITALIAN RESTAURANTS 






3958 Broadway (166th St.) 


1148 St. Nicholas Avenue 




Bet. 167th and 168th Sis. 


Opposite Medical Center 


WA. 3-9216-9217 


Phone LO. 8-8590 


4199 Broadway 




At 178th St. 

WA. 3-9181 


Spec/a/ Discount to Students 




Compliments of 


WA. 7-5700 Lie. 532 


SPEVACK 


M. CITARELLA, Inc. 


SURGICAL SUPPLY 


WINES AND LIQUORS 


Incorporated 




1345 NOSTRAND AVENUE 


Visit Our Wine Cellar 


BROOKLYN 26, NEW YORK 




BU. 2-7711 -2 


3915 BROADWAY near 164th STREET 


Complete Equipment Service 


NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 


from the 




Student to the Specialist 


NELSON'S 


KING CARD & BOOK SHOP 

4031 ' i Broadway bet. 169 and 170 Sts. 


KOSHER DELICATESSEN & RESTAURANT 


SOCIAL AND BUSINESS PRINTING 




Hallmark Cards For All Occasions 


CATERERS 

Home Cooked Lunches 

and Full Course Dinners 


No Charge for Ordering Books 


COURTESY CARDS 


Wines - Liquors - Cocktails Served 


Medical Center Pharmacy 




Jacob Kaplan, F.A.C.A. 


4041 Broadway (Corner 170th St.) 


4013 Broadway bet. 168th and 169th Sti. 


WA. 3-9606 


WA. 3-1258 




Specialists In Prescription Compounding 



87 



THE P & S 

ALUMNI 

ASSOCIATION 



To Each Member of the 

CLASS OF 1964 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 
For A Happy and Successful Career 



REME RESTAURANT 

FOOD OF DISTINCTION 

4021 Broadway, Corner 169th St. 

New York City 

Air Conditioned 



WA. 7-3233 

LARRY ORIN 

JEWELER 

Electronically Tested Watch Repair 

4009 Broadway at 168th Street 
New York 32, N. Y. 

Special Discounts for Hospital Personnel 



THE MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 



EXTENDS ITS SINCEREST GOOD WISHES 



TO 



THE CLASS OF 1964 



WA. 3-2424 



"Say It With Flowers' 



Medical Center Flower Shop 

CARDASIS, INC., FLORIST 

ARTISTIC DECORATION FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
The Flower Shop Nearest The Medical Center 

"We Telegraph Flowers" 

4003 Broadway at 168th Street 



Ringler-Rados Surgical Corp. 

OUR 40TH YEAR OF SERVICE 

Across From The Medical Center 

3958 Broadway WA. 7-2152 



SILVER PALM 
LUNCHEONETTE 

4001 Broadway, Comer 168th St. 



89 




H. G. Roebuck and Son 

INCORPORATED 

PRINTERS and LITHOGRAPHERS 



2140 Aisquith Street Baltimore 18, Maryland 

HOpkins 7-6700 



Producers of Distinctive Annuals 
For Schools and Colleges Since 1919 



90 



R oger S tudios 



PORTRAITS OF DISTINCTION 



& 



4143 BROADWAY 

NEW YORK 32, NEW YORK 

Phone: WA. 7-7894 



0? 



WE KEEP NEGATIVES OF YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS ON FILE 
FOR MANY YEARS AFTER GRADUATION 



91 



YEARBOOK STAFF 



William Stiehm Editor 

Lewis Hamilton Business Manager 

Theodore Robbins Associate Editor 

David Forrest ' Artist 

Anthony Pietropinto Contributing Editor 

Richard Lipton, Joseph McCarthy, 

Charles Parsons Photographers 

Captions Committee: Bruce Ballard, Matthew Rechler, Philip Rogal, 
Cedric Porter, Lawrence Rappaport, Lawrence Cervino, John Mulliken. 



Below: Members of the staff gather to discuss yearbook policy in the Presbyterian Hospital garden. Robbins. Hamilton, Stiehm, and 
Forrest (below). 




92 




V 




a. 



w< 



* V- ■■>**, 



vi 








V 1 



ft a.